Skip to main content

Anthropology: Books

Call Number Ranges

Books on the broad subject of Anthropology can be found in the "GN" call number area of the General Collection and the Reference Collection.

Some selected new books are highlighted here.

Many books on the Anthropology or Ethnography or Ethnology or Social / Cultural aspects of various ethnic / culture groups or countries / regions, will be found under other call numbers.  Use the Library Catalog below to search for these books by keyword. 

One sample search might be something like:  Africa AND ethnic group* 

Or just the name of the culture group:   Zulu     

Or like this:   Brazil AND social conditions

Or like this:  Hispanic* AND cultur*

The asterisks at the end of the word are truncation features, and allow you to pick up variations of the word:

culture or cultures or cultural       without having to type out separately all the variations of a word.

NEARBY PUBLIC AND ACADEMIC LIBRARIES

Outline of the Library of Congress Classification System (what COD uses to arrange its books on the shelves).

Search the Library Catalog

Use our catalog to find books, videos, and other resources in our collections.

Advanced Search

Selected New Books

The Human Swarm

The epic story and ultimate big history of how human society evolved from intimate chimp communities into the sprawling civilizations of a world-dominating species If a chimpanzee ventures into the territory of a different group, it will almost certainly be killed. But a New Yorker can fly to Los Angeles--or Borneo--with very little fear. Psychologists have done little to explain this: for years, they have held that our biology puts a hard upper limit--about 150 people--on the size of our social groups. But human societies are in fact vastly larger. How do we manage--by and large--to get along with each other? In this paradigm-shattering book, biologist Mark W. Moffett draws on findings in psychology, sociology and anthropology to explain the social adaptations that bind societies. He explores how the tension between identity and anonymity defines how societies develop, function, and fail. Surpassing Guns, Germs, and Steel and Sapiens, The Human Swarm reveals how mankind created sprawling civilizations of unrivaled complexity--and what it will take to sustain them.

Who We Are and How We Got Here

A groundbreaking book about how ancient DNA has profoundly changed our understanding of human history.   Geneticists like David Reich have made astounding advances in the field of genomics, which is proving to be as important as archeology, linguistics, and written records as a means to understand our ancestry.    In Who We Are and How We Got Here, Reich allows readers to discover how the human genome provides not only all the information a human embryo needs to develop but also the hidden story of our species. Reich delves into how the genomic revolution is transforming our understanding of modern humans and how DNA studies reveal deep inequalities among different populations, between the sexes, and among individuals. Provocatively, Reich's book suggests that there might very well be biological differences among human populations but that these differences are unlikely to conform to common stereotypes.   Drawing upon revolutionary findings and unparalleled scientific studies, Who We Are and How We Got Here is a captivating glimpse into humankind--where we came from and what that says about our lives today.

You

What are you? Obviously, you are a person with human ancestors that can be plotted on a family tree, but you have other identities as well. According to evolutionary biologists, you are a member of the species Homo sapiens and as such have ancestral species that can be plotted on the tree oflife. According to microbiologists, you are a collection of cells, each of which has a cellular ancestry that goes back billions of years. A geneticist, though, will think of you primarily as a gene-replication machine and might produce a tree that reveals the history of any given gene. And finally,a physicist will give a rather different answer to the identity question: you can best be understood as a collection of atoms, each of which has a very long history. Some have been around since the Big Bang, and others are the result of nuclear fusion that took place within a star. Not only that,but most of your atoms belonged to other living things before joining you. From your atoms' point of view, then, you are just a way station on a multibillion-year-long journey.You: A Natural History offers a multidisciplinary investigation of your hyperextended family tree, going all the way back to the Big Bang. And while your family tree may contain surprises, your hyperextended history contains some truly amazing stories. As the result of learning more about who andwhat you are, and about how you came to be here, you will likely see the world around you with fresh eyes. You will also become aware of all the one-off events that had to take place for your existence to be possible: stars had to explode, the earth had to be hit 4.5 billion years ago by aplanetesimal and 65 million years ago by an asteroid, microbes had to engulf microbes, the African savanna had to undergo climate change, and of course, any number of your direct ancestors had to meet and mate. It is difficult, on becoming aware of just how contingent your own existence is, not tofeel very lucky to be part of our universe.

Your Librarian

Dan Blewett's picture
Dan Blewett
Contact:
Library 3136
630-942-2279
Website
  • URL: https://cod.libguides.com/anthropology
  • Last Updated: Sep 12, 2019 3:58 PM
  • Print Page